GitHub and the working group – Part II

In an earlier post, I outlined my plans to try to teach and use GitHub for code related to our big Biodiversity Working Group. Feb 22-26, 20 members of the group met in Leipzig, Germany, and 6 more (including myself) participated remotely (#sChange on twitter). I felt this was a bit of an experiment, as our group is quite large, and I knew that the majority of participants would be novice git users. There is much yet to do now that the workshop is over, but after a week, I can definitely identify a few challenges and successes in using GitHub for our working group. Continue reading

GitHub and the working group

Over the past year, I’ve been co-organizing a jointly-funded, large, international working group (with co-PIs Maria Dornelas, Mary O’Connor, and Andrew Gonzalez). The group has had several meetings now (October 2014, May 2015, June 2015) and will meet again next week with the goal of finishing ongoing projects and making major progress on several new ones. I’ve learned a lot about managing large collaborative working groups through this process, but one area I’ve been thinking a lot about this week is how to maintain good communication before, during, and after the working group, especially with respect to code. Continue reading

Citizen and Open Science Approaches in the Anthropocene

This week I’m at the annual Ecological Society of America meeting (ESA) to take in the buffet of ecology! There’s a great Organized Session happening tomorrow (8-11:30 am, Tuesday August 11) on “New Perspectives for Ecology during the Anthropocene: New Paradigms, Technologies and Collaborations“. We’ll be tweeting at #AnthropEcology and #ESA100 if you’d like to follow along remotely.

My talk on citizen and open science approaches, using our hummingbird hummer_bandmigration study as an example, is online at figshare and I encourage tweeting/sharing if you attend the presentation (apparently ESA’s official policy this year is to assume that tweeting is NOT OK, unless explicitly invited to tweet).

If you’re at ESA this year, come say hi to me @srsupp!

Contribute time-series datasets for biodiversity change!

For the past year, I’ve been helping to lead of a series of Biodiversity Change Working Groups (funded via sDiv and CIEE, with Maria Dornelas, Mary O’Connor and Andrew Gonzalez). Our goals include resolving controversy in the magnitude and direction of observed diversity changes, theoretically evalutaing methods for estimating and comparing biodiversity across scales, assessing current gaps in data, and analyzing current time series datasets of biodiversity. We are assembling a database of biodiversity time series. Continue reading

What citizen scientist birdwatchers can tell us about hummingbird migration

This is a public research summary of: Supp, Sarah R., Frank A. La Sorte, Tina A. Cormier, Marisa C. W. Lim, Don R. Powers, Susan M. Wethington, and Catherine H. Graham. 2015. Citizen-science data provides new insight into annual and seasonal variation in migration patterns. Ecosphere 6: art15.  http://dx.doi.org/10.1890/ES14-00290.1 [Open Access]

Our recent paper in Ecosphere uses citizen science data from eBird to look at the movement patterns for five migratory  species of North American hummingbirds. Continue reading